New Year’s resolutions

With Christmas over and the New Year looming, many of us will be thinking about the fitness goals that we would like to achieve.

But how should you make these goals, and how can you stick to them?

This helpful article from Women’s Health will answer all your questions on setting goals and how to stick to them.

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Other foolproof ways to stick to your fitness goals:

Write down your goals

Writing down a list of your fitness goals helps you to clearly plan and realise what you want to achieve. Keep this list in a place that you can see them to remind yourself of them when you’re lacking in motivation.

Tell friends and family about your goals

This can help them remind you and motivate you of what you would like to achieve, and they can offer you vital support.

Buy new workout clothes

Even the most fitness phobic among us can’t help but feel ready to hit the gym when they’re clad in some funky leggings or the latest trainers. Buy some affordable workout gear from Missguided or splash out on the latest sportswear from Nike.

Fitness gadgets

Use fitness gadgets such as My Fitness Pal  or even buy a Fitbit to help keep track of your goals and engage with other people in the fitness community.

Boogie Bounce

 

My thighs are burning as I bounce up and down.

Sweating and out of breath, every muscle in my body aches, and I’m pretty sure I’m exercising muscles that I didn’t even know existed.

“Now let me see those high knees!” shouts the instructor.

I grudgingly oblige, lifting my sore legs as far as they can go, trying to enjoy my first experience on a trampoline since I was a child.

A ten minute trampoline workout is the fitness equivalent of running a mile

Boogie Bounce is an all over aerobic work out which claims to torch calories.

It is claimed that just a ten minute trampoline workout is the fitness equivalent of running a mile.

The hour long class also includes a short conditioning session which further tightens up those wobbly bums, tums and thighs.

Whilst this high energy fitness class has been around for approximately 18 years, it has recently had a surge in popularity, with new classes popping up all over the UK.

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Trampoline is a safer alternative to jogging, which can put strain on the joints

Trampolining is also considered to be an alternative to jogging, as unlike pounding the pavements, bouncing on a trampoline is considered to be a low impact sport, which means that your joints will be protected whilst exercising your muscles.

It is also believed that the repetitive bouncing movement helps build up the skeleton and improves bone mineral content- perfect for preventing brittle bone disease or osteoporosis.

The repetitive bouncing movement helps build up the skeleton and improves bone mineral content.

To discover what all the fuss is about, I decided to attend a class at Coleshill Social Club in Birmingham.

The majority of the class was spent bouncing on the mini trampolines, maximising the calories burnt during the session.

As well as simply bouncing up and down, the class saw us doing mini star jumps, doing small jumps backwards and forwards, hamstring curls and Russian twists.

It was the Russian twists which proved to be a real killer, with every single person in the room wincing in pain as the instructor cheerfully informed us that we had to do them for a whole minute!

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Boogie Bounce sees participants take on a variety of exercises, all whilst bouncing up and down on a mini trampoline

The end of the class saw us stretch our aching bodies on the floor for a 20 minute conditioning session.

This was a really great way to end the class as it enabled our bodies to cool down whilst trying to enhance our flexibility.

Although I found it quite hard, the class overall was really fun, and a great alternative to regular fitness classes.

My legs and abs ached for a good few days after, proving that the class gives you a really good work out!

Fancy bouncing your way back into fitness?

Check out the details of classes. 

Have you ever been to a Boogie Bounce class?  Tweet me or comment below!

Watch the video below to discover more about Boogie Bounce

Roll up, roll up! There’s a new fitness craze in town!

Loud, pumping music fills the room that contains about a dozen trapezes hanging from the low ceiling. The girls seamlessly switch from slowly swinging from the trapeze by their hands to being upside down, their long legs wrapped around the bar.

Whilst this might not sound like your average exercise session, these girls are actually in the middle of a TrapFit class.

TrapFit is a low flying aerial trapeze fitness class. It requires intense strength work, cardio movement and deep stretching.

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Originating from Hollywood, the home of fitness fads, TrapFit has spread to other countries.

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The class begins with 20 minutes of warm up – safely on the ground, followed by another 20 minutes of warm up using a very heavy aluminium and rubber bar, before exercises begin on the trapeze itself.

Although the circus themed fitness class may seem like a lot of fun, experts warn that it is an extremely intense full body work out, and should only be undertaken by those who are already relatively fit.

Have you ever tried TrapFit? Tweet me or message me on Facebook.

Watch the video below to find out more about TrapFit.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hate boring yoga? I’ve got the purrfect solution for you!

Hatha, Bikram, Trantra. These are all types of yoga that I’m familiar with. But cat yoga?

When I first read about cat yoga in this article I was intrigued. Most of the cats I’ve ever encountered aren’t shy about using their teeth and claws, so how could this work in a yoga class?

We hope to be as flexible as this little guy one day!
We hope to be as flexible as this little guy one day!

Cat yoga appears to be gathering force in the UK, with various studios offering a session with our favourite feline friends.

The leading establishment in this new trend is Lady Dinah’s Cat Emporium.

Lady Dinah’s Cat Emporium in Shoreditch, London, initially began as a cat cafe, and has recently began to hold cat yoga sessions every Wednesday.

Fancy doing yoga covered by these cuties?
Fancy doing yoga covered by these cuties?

Whilst regular yoga is known for its relaxing benefits, it is believed that yoga sessions with cats will allow for further relaxation.

Having been assured that all the cats are well trained, I really want to try this out!

Have any of you tried cat yoga? Tweet me or message me on Facebook!

Cat yoga at Lady Dinah’s Cat Emporium is £15 a session.